Modifying Antiretroviral Therapy in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients
Source: Clinical Resources From inPractice HIV

Module

José R. Arribas, MD, discusses the rationale for and clinical trial data on the modification of virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy regimens, including important considerations for individualized decision making.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Integrate best practices in the management of regimen modifications in virologically suppressed patients

Topics covered include:

  • Reasons for Modifying ART
  • Considerations Before Modifying ART
  • Importance of the Genetic Barrier to Resistance of the New Regimen
  • Importance of Duration of Virologic Suppression
  • Importance of Expected Level of Adherence
  • Modifying Boosted PI Regimens
  • Modifying NRTIs
  • Modifying NNRTIs
  • Maintaining Virologic Suppression With Boosted PI Monotherapy
 

Program Directors

  • Joseph J. Eron, Jr.
    MD
    Daniel R. Kuritzkes
    MD
    Kathleen E. Squires
    MD
    Eric S. Daar
    MD

Faculty

  • José R. Arribas
    MD
  • Release Date:
    January 31, 2017

Information on this Educational Activity

Program Directors

Joseph J. Eron, Jr., MD

Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Director, AIDS Clinical Trials Unit
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Joseph J. Eron, Jr., MD, has disclosed that he has received funds for research support from AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, Janssen, and ViiV; consulting fees from AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, Merck, Roche Molecular Systems, Tibotec/Janssen, and ViiV; and has served on the data and safety monitoring board for TaiMed.

 

Daniel R. Kuritzkes, MD

Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Daniel R. Kuritzkes, MD, has disclosed that he has received consulting fees from Bionor, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, InnaVirVax, Janssen, Merck, Oncolys, Teva, ViiV, and ViroStatics; fees for non-CME/CE services from Merck; and funds for research support from Gilead Sciences.

 

Kathleen E. Squires, MD

W. Paul and Ida H. Havens Professor of Infectious Diseases
Director,
Division of Infectious Diseases
Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Kathleen E. Squires, MD, has disclosed that she has served on advisory boards for scientific purposes for Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, Janssen, Merck, and ViiV; has served on advisory boards for marketing purposes for Gilead Sciences and Janssen; and has received funds for research support from Gilead Sciences.

 

Eric S. Daar, MD

Chief, Division of HIV Medicine
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
Professor of Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Los Angeles, California

Eric S. Daar, MD, has disclosed that he has received consulting fees from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, Janssen, Merck, Teva, and ViiV and funds for research support from Gilead Sciences, Merck, and ViiV.

 

Faculty

José R. Arribas, MD


Research Director (HIV and Infectious Diseases)
Hospital La Paz. IdiPAZ.
Madrid, Spain

José R. Arribas, MD, has disclosed that he has received consulting fees from Gilead Sciences, Janssen, Merck Sharp & Dohme, and ViiV.

 

Staff

Jennifer M. Blanchette, PhD


Managing Editor

Jennifer M. Blanchette, PhD, has nothing to disclose with regard to commercial interests.

 

Edward King, MA


Executive Vice President

Edward King, MA, has nothing to disclose with regard to commercial interests.

 

Jenny Schulz, PhD


Editorial Director, Virology & Other Therapeutic Areas

Jenny Schulz, PhD, has nothing to disclose with regard to commercial interests.

 

Heather Stieglitz, PhD


Editorial Contributor

Heather Stieglitz, PhD, has nothing to disclose with regard to commercial interests.

 

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