The US HIV Epidemic: Why Is Prevention Failing?
Source: HIV/AIDS Annual Update 2008

Module

Thomas J. Coates, PhD, reviews the current epidemiology of HIV infection in the United States and discusses the most recent developments in strategies to prevent HIV transmission.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the differential impacts of the HIV epidemic on US racial and geographic groups
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current HIV prevention approaches
  • Describe the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for HIV screening and testing
  • Discuss the role of healthcare providers in HIV prevention efforts

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction
  • Epidemiology of HIV in the United States
  • Challenges in HIV Prevention
  • HIV Prevention Science: Successes and Difficulties
  • Expanded Routine HIV Testing Recommendations
  • Detecting New HIV Infections
  • Healthcare Providers' Role in HIV Prevention
  • A Holistic Perspective: Focus on Highly Active HIV Prevention
  • Goal: Reducing US HIV Incidence From 60,000 to 30,000 per Year
  • A Final Word: Implement HIV Prevention
  • Summary: Implications for Clinical Practice
 

Faculty

  • Thomas J. Coates
    PhD

Credit Information

  • Release Date:
    June 02, 2008
  • Expiration Date:
    June 01, 2009
  • Physicians:
    maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
  • Registered Nurses:
    0.8 Nursing contact hours

Information on this Educational Activity

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Postgraduate Institute for Medicine (PIM) assesses conflict of interest with its instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of CME activities. All relevant conflicts of interest that are identified are thoroughly vetted by PIM for fair balance, scientific objectivity of studies utilized in this activity, and patient care recommendations. PIM is committed to providing its learners with high-quality CME activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty and CCO staff reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouse/life partner have with commercial interests related to the content of this CME activity.

 

Faculty

Thomas J. Coates, PhD


Michael and Sue Steinberg Professor of Global AIDS Research
Division of Infectious Diseases
Department of Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles, California

Thomas J. Coates, PhD, has no significant financial relationships to disclose.
 

Staff

Edward King, MA


Vice President, Editorial
Clinical Care Options, LLC

Edward King, MA, has no significant financial relationships to disclose.
 

Steven McGuire, 


Managing Editor, HIV
Clinical Care Options, LLC
Steven McGuire has no significant financial relationships to disclose.
 

Lisa M. Cockrell, PhD


Editorial Contributor

Lisa Cockrell has no significant financial relationships to disclose.
 

Melinda Tanzola, Ph.D.


Editorial Contributor
Melinda Tanzola has no significant financial relationships to disclose.
 

The content of this activity has been reviewed by an independent peer reviewer to ensure that it is balanced, objective, and free from any commercial bias. The peer reviewer has disclosed no financial relationships relevant to the content of this activity.

The following PIM clinical content reviewers, Linda Graham, RN; Jan Hixon, RN; and Trace Hutchison, PharmD, hereby state that they or their spouse/life partner do not have any financial relationships or relationships to products or devices with any commercial interests related to the content of this CME activity of any amount during the past 12 months.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Use
This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the FDA. Postgraduate Institute of Medicine (PIM) and Clinical Care Options, LLC do not recommend the use of any agent outside of the labeled indications.

The opinions expressed in the educational activity are those of the faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of PIM and Clinical Care Options, LLC. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indication, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer
Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patient’s conditions and possible contraindications on dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

 

Target Audience

This activity is designed as a state-of-the-art curriculum for front-line physicians, registered nurses, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals involved in the management of HIV-infected patients.


Purpose

The purpose of this activity is to provide participants with an update on the past year’s advances in HIV research and care and to illuminate the implications of those advances for practical prevention and treatment strategies.


Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the differential impacts of the HIV epidemic on US racial and geographic groups
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current HIV prevention approaches
  • Describe the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for HIV screening and testing
  • Discuss the role of healthcare providers in HIV prevention efforts
 

Physician Continuing Medical Education

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of Postgraduate Institute for Medicine and Clinical Care Options, LLC. Postgraduate Institute for Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

Postgraduate Institute for Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

Nursing Continuing Education

Accreditation Statement

CNA/ANCC

This educational activity for 0.8 contact hour(s) is provided by Postgraduate Institute for Medicine (PIM).

PIM is an approved provider of continuing education by the Colorado Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

 

Commercial Support


This program is supported by educational grants from Abbott Virology, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck & Co., Inc., Pfizer Inc., and Tibotec Therapeutics.

 

Program Medium


This program has been made available online, and in print.

 

Site Requirements


  • Internet Explorer 7+, Firefox 3+, Safari 3+, or Chrome
  • JavaScript enabled
  • 1024x768+ screen resolution
  • Adobe Flash Player
 

Instructions for Credit

Participation in this self-study activity should be completed in approximately 0.75 hours. To successfully complete this activity and receive credit, participants must follow these steps during the period from June 02, 2008, through June 01, 2009:

1. Register online at http://www.clinicaloptions.com.
2. Read the target audience, learning objectives, and faculty disclosures.
3. Study the educational activity online or printed out.
4. Submit answers to the posttest questions and evaluation questions online.

You must receive a test score of at least 70% and respond to all evaluation questions to receive a certificate. After submitting the evaluation, you may access your online certificate by selecting the certificate link on the posttest confirmation page. Records of all CME activities completed can be found on the "CME Manager" page. There are no costs/fees for this activity.

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